Preliminary Guide to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Records
Digitized Content

Summary
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.1086
Creators:
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.
Garrett, John W. (John Work), 1820-1884
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Latrobe, Benj. H. (Benjamin Henry), 1807-1878
Dates:
1827-1987
Languages:
English
Physical Description:
33 cubic feet
75 boxes, 46 oversize folders
Repository:
The collection consists of correspondence, invoices, drawings, photographs, and negatives and other printed literature documenting the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from its inception in 1827 to its merger with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad in the 1960s.

Scope and Contents
Scope and Contents
The collection consists of correspondence, engineering drawings, notes, photographs, transparencies, negatives, glass plate negatives, printed materials, and newspaper clippings documenting the Baltimore and Ohio railroad from its inception in 1827 to its merger with the Chesapeake and Ohio in the 1960s.

Arrangement
Arrangement
The records are arranged into ten series.
Series 1, Historical Background, 1827-1987
Series 2, Bridge Histories, 1867-1966
Series 3, President's Office, 1826-1880
Series 4, Correspondence, 1826-1859
Series 5, Business Records, 1894-1914, and undated
Series 6, Agreement, 1870
Series 7, Drawings, 1858-1957, and undated
Subseries 7.1, Indices and Lists, 1924-1943, undated
Subseries 7.2, Bailey's Station, 1887; 1899; 1901
Subseries 7.3, Baltimore Belt Railroad, 1895, undated
Subseries 7.4, Bay View and Canton Bridges, 1884-1885
Subseries 7.5, Big Seneca Creek Viaduct, 1905
Subseries 7.6, Bollman Bridges, undated
Subseries 7.7, Boyds, Maryland Station, 1886; 1927
Subseries 7.8, Bridewell Station, undated
Subseries 7.9, Bridges (general), 1893-1917
Subseries 7.10, Brunswick, Maryland, 1890-1907
Subseries 7.11, Building Materials List, undated
Subseries 7.12, Building Signs, 1911-1912
Subseries 7.13, Camden Station, 1881-1942 (not inclusive)
Subseries 7.14, Camden Station (related), 1881-1915
Subseries 7.15, Centenary Bridge Models, 1927
Subseries 7.16, Central Office Building, undated
Subseries 7.17, Chestnut Street Station, 1925-1952
Subseries 7.18, Coaling facilities, water tanks, turntables, and miscellaneous structures, 1888-1912
Subseries 7.19, Cumberland Station, 1910-1955
Subseries 7.20, Curtis Bay Branch, 1900-1911
Subseries 7.21, Frederick Station, 1908-1915
Subseries 7.22, Hyattsville Station, 1913
Subseries 7.23, Keedysville Station, undated
Subseries 7.24, Laurel Station, undated
Subseries 7.25, Ledger, undated
Subseries 7.26, Lieperville Station, 1889
Subseries 7.27, Locust Point, 1881-1957
Subseries 7.28, Maps, 1862; 1918
Subseries 7.29, Martinsburg, West Virginia, 1913-1927
Subseries 7.30, Miscellaneous Buildings, 1875-1956
Subseries 7.31, Miscellaneous Large Photographs, undated
Subseries 7.32, Miscellaneous Structures, 1890-1916
Subseries 7.33: Mt. Clare (general)
Subseries 7.34, Mt. Clare New Blue Line Stable, 1899; 1905
Subseries 7.35, Mt. Clare New Car Shops, undated
Subseries 7.36, Mt. Royal Station, undated
Subseries 7.37, Newton Falls and Fairpoint, Ohio, 1909
Subseries 7.38, Patapsco River Bridge, 1883
Subseries 7.39, Plans for house no. 1846 (N. Gay Street, Baltimore, Maryland), undated
Subseries 7.40, Point of Rocks Station, 1951
Subseries 7.41, Scales, 1903
Subseries 7.42, Signal towers, 1900-1908
Subseries 7.43, Stations (general), 1866-1907
Subseries 7.44, Sykesville Station, undated
Subseries 7.45, Untitled, undated
Subseries 7.46, Warnings, 1894-1911
Subseries 7.47, Woodstock Station, undated
Subseries 7.48, Miscellaneous (rolled), 1858-1930 (not inclusive)
Series 8, Photographs and Copy Prints, 1872-1980s (not inclusive)
Subseries 8.1, Photographs, 1872-1980s
Subseries 8.2, Copy prints, 1901-1931, undated
Subseries 8.3, Indices and Lists, 1909-1920
Series 9, Negatives, 1850-1983 (bulk 1920s-1930s)
Subseries 9.1, Glass plate negatives (unidentified), undated
Subseries 9.2, Glass plate negatives (numbered), 1850-1957 (bulk 1920s-1930s)
Subseries 9.3, Negatives by number, undated
Subseries 9.4, Negatives by location, 1870; 1978-1983
Subseries 9.5, Negatives by subject, 1922-1930s, undated
Series 10, Stations and Buildings, 1884-1982

Biographical / Historical
Biographical / Historical
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) was the nation's first extensive steam powered railroad. It was founded by Baltimore merchants in 1827 as a means of promoting trade and making Baltimore competitive with other east coast ports. The original intent of the founders was to provide direct and fast access to the Ohio River, and the markets that the river reached. The railroad, however, went beyond the Ohio River and its lines went as far west as St. Louis and Chicago. The B&O was also known for its use of an electric locomotive in the mid 1890s. It also had a completely air conditioned train, and it was a forerunner in the use of diesel-electric locomotives. Company activities paralleled those of other American railroads and over the course of its life included expansion, near bankruptcy, innovations, regulations, and finally buy out. In February 1963, the Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) completed its purchase of the B&O. Today, B&O is part of the CSX Transportation (CSX) network.
John Work Garrett president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 1858-1884, was born in Baltimore, Maryland July 31, 1820. He was the second son of Elizabeth Stouffer and Robert Garrett. He married Rachel Ann Harrison, the daughter of Thomas Harrison, a Baltimore merchant. They had one daughter, Mary and two sons Robert and Thomas Harrison Garrett.
After attending Lafayette College (Pennsylvania) for two years John W. Garrett left in 1836 to become associated with his father's commission business in Baltimore. The commission house which dealt in wholesale groceries, produce, forwarding and a commission business expanded to establish direct connections with Latin America, seek outlets in Europe and develop its own banking operations. In time its financial operations overshadowed the commission and shipping business.
When John W. Garrett began to invest heavily in Baltimore and Ohio Railroad stock, the road was in competition with the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the stock was not popular. Its value rose steadily over the years. Mr. Garrett was elected a director of the railroad in 1855. His report as chairman of a subcommittee on the need for additional funds to complete the line to the Ohio River led to his election to the presidency of the road on November 17, 1858, a position he held for 26 years. New policies with emphasis on economy, personal supervision and gradual expansion were inaugurated and consistently maintained, in spite of a general financial crisis, Mr. Garrett's first year in office showed a net gain in earnings.
Sympathetic to his southern friends during the Civil War, Mr. Garrett nevertheless supported the Union. He recognized the inevitability of Confederate defeat by superior northern resources. Confederate leaders blamed him for their inability to seize Washington and he received warm appreciation for his services to the Union cause from President Lincoln. The railroad stretched along the theater of war and twice crossed Confederate territory. It was, therefore, a main objective for southern attack. Branches were frequently damaged by Confederate raids, but the main line to Washington became important for the transport of troops and supplies. The Baltimore and Ohio carried out the first military rail transport in history and the transfer of 20,000 men from the Potomac to Chattanooga in 1863 was a major triumph for its president.
With the advent of peace Mr. Garrett turned to rebuilding and strengthening the railroad. He replaced equipment and track damaged by the war, then extended the system by securing direct routes to Pittsburgh and Chicago and arranging an independent line into New York. Wharves were built at Locust Point for ocean liners and a system of elevators erected. The B&O. built its own sleeping and dining cars, established hotels in the mountains and created its own express company. By 1880, after battles over rates with other trunk lines, a costly rivalry with the Pennsylvania Railroad over the eastern route and charges of discrimination against local shippers Mr. Garrett was at the height of his success. He cooperated in establishing the B. and 0. Employees Relief Association for accident and life insurance, a hospital system, saving and building funds, and arrangements for improving sanitation in the work place. He was on friendly terms with Johns Hopkins, a trustee of John Hopkins Hospital, and with George Peabody, founder of the Peabody institute of which he was also a trustee. Garrett County, Maryland was named in his honor.
John W. Garrett died on September 26, 1884 within a year of his wife's death in a carriage accident. During his connection with the railroad the stock increased from $57 to $200; at the outbreak of the Civil War the railroad was operating 514 miles of rail, gross earnings were $4,000,097 and net per mile was $4246.1 By 1864 gross earnings were $10,138,876 and net per mile, $7113.2 By the end of his presidency mileage had increased to 1711 miles and net earnings were $4535 per mile.3
References
1
National Cyclopedia of American Biography
Vol. 18:3
2
National Cyclopedia of American Biography
Vol. 18:3
3
National Cyclopedia of American Biography
Vol. 18:3

Administration
Processing Information
Processed by Alison Oswald, archivist, January 2010.
Author
Alison Oswald, archivist
Immediate Source of Acquisition
This collection was donated to the National Museum of American History by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Public Relations Office in the 1960s.

Using the Collection
Conditions Governing Access
The collection is open for research use.
Physical Access: Researchers must handle unprotected photographs and glass plate negatives with gloves.
Conditions Governing Use
Copyright held by the Smithsonian Institution. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply.
Preferred Citation
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Records, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Related Materials
Materials at Other Organizations

Accruals
Accruals
The John W. Garrett Collection (AC0171) of approximately .6 cubic feet was combined with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Records (AC1086).

Custodial History
Custodial History
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Records were transferred to the Archives Center from the Division of Work and Industry, 2007. The John W. Garrett Collection (AC0171) was donated to the Division of Transportation, now the Division of Work & Industry by Lawrence W. Sagle.

Keywords
Keywords table of terms and types.
Keyword Terms Keyword Types
Railroads Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Engineering -- 19th century Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Repairing -- Railroads Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Railway engineering -- 1860-1890 Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Tracings Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Correspondence -- 19th century Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Drawings -- 1860-1890 Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Bridges Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Construction Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI. Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid

Repository Contact
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
P.O. Box 37012
Suite 1100, MRC 601
Washington, D.C. 20013-7012
archivescenter@si.edu
http://americanhistory.si.edu/archives