Guide to the Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film

Summary
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.1197
Creators:
Anderson, Harold M.
Dates:
1948-1952
Languages:
English
Physical Description:
1 item
1 reel.
Repository:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street Film documents many of the neighborhood's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. Reverand Andserson also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.

Scope and Contents
Scope and Contents
A black and white, silent 16mm film documenting the people and businesses of the Black Wall Street section of Tulsa, Oklahoma from 1948-1952.

Arrangement
Arrangement
Arranged in one series.
Series 1, Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film

Biographical / Historical
Biographical / Historical
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community that was destroyed during a race riot that broke out in 1921. Its businesses were burned to the ground and the residents were displaced. Against the odds, Black Wall Street was reborn and by the 1940s was once again a center for African American life in Tulsa.
Reverend Harold Mose Anderson's film titled Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street documents evidence of this resurgance. Although Anderson was only a year old when the riots occurred, he grew up hearing stories about life in Black Wall Street before the riot. He was both a witness to and participant in the rebuilding and revival of the community. And, he documented the resulting renewal with his 16mm motion picture camera.
Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street does just that. A successful businessman, Anderson managed and then owned two neighborhood movie theaters, a skating rink, bowling alley, and shopping strip, among other enterprises. He also brought the Golden Gloves boxing tournament to the area, making it accessible to African American fans. Anderson felt that it was critical that Black Wall Street sustain independent African American business, ensuring resident dollars would stay in the community and guarantee its vibrancy.
Almost lost in a devastating house fire, Reverend Anderson's film recognizes the efforts and successes of the community. With his camera he documented many of Black Wall Street's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. He also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.

Administration
Processing Information
Processed by Wendy Shay, audiovisual archivist, 2010.
Author
Wendy Shay
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Donated to the Archives Center by Patricia Sanders on behalf of the heirs of Harold M. Anderson in 2009.

Using the Collection
Conditions Governing Access
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment. Reference copy in Smithsonian Institution Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) must be used.
Preferred Citation
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film, 1948-1952, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Conditions Governing Use
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. All third party requests to use the film for other than standard museum purposes are to be direced to GettyImages. See repository for information.

Keywords
Keywords table of terms and types.
Keyword Terms Keyword Types
African American neighborhoods Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
African American churches Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Parades -- United States Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Riots -- 1920-1930 -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
African American businesspeople Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Oklahoma -- Tulsa Place Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Motion pictures (visual works) Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Nixon, Richard M. Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Nixon, Pat, 1912- Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid

Repository Contact
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
P.O. Box 37012
Suite 1100, MRC 601
Washington, D.C. 20013-7012
archivescenter@si.edu
http://americanhistory.si.edu/archives