Alice Pike Barney Papers and Related Material,
circa 1889-1995

Summary
Collection ID:
Record Unit 7473
Creators:
Barney, Alice Pike, 1857-1931
Dates:
circa 1889-1995
Languages:
English
Physical Description:
15.63 cu. ft. (26 document boxes) (4 12x17 boxes) (1 21x25 box) (1 oversize folder)
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Introduction
Introduction
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.

Descriptive Entry
Descriptive Entry
The strength of the Alice Pike Barney Papers lies in its extensive holdings of Alice Pike Barney's plays, mime dramas, ballets, short stories, and novel-length works. Some of the manuscripts are present in multiple copies, in varied stages of editing. They span Barney's life from circa 1904 to 1931. Also included are selected scenes and roles from her plays, known as sides and parts, and accompanying musical scores. Many of the theatrical works were performed at various public theaters in Washington, D.C., or at Barney Studio House, and at Theatre Mart in Hollywood.
Also included are manuscripts of plays by other authors, sent to Barney for review and for possible production at Theatre Mart. Theatre Mart contracts between playwrights and Barney are arranged in alphabetical order by playwright.
Autobiographical information for Alice Pike Barney consists of her fictionalized, unpublished autobiography, which focuses on her romance with British explorer Sir Henry Morton Stanley, a date book covering the year 1926 in Hollywood, California, and Barney family lineage information compiled in 1921 by a relative.
Laura Clifford Dreyfuss-Barney's records consist of a childhood autograph book, diaries recording her correspondents from 1931-1939, 1951, and 1953-1963, and a travel journal in manuscript form. Her papers also contain a collection of her short stories and one play, Legion of Honor awards for her service in both World Wars, and a monogrammed handkerchief belonging to her father, Albert Clifford Barney.
Finally, the Barney collection includes records of Barney Studio House and other Barney residences, including blueprints, architectural drawings, visitors' register, and newspaper clippings regarding the divestment of the Barney Studio House by the Smithsonian Institution.

Historical Note
Historical Note
Alice Pike Barney (1857-1931) is best remembered for her efforts to transform Washington, D.C., into the nation's cultural capital during the first quarter of the twentieth century. Barney's interest in art began in her childhood, under the influence of her father, Samuel Nathan Pike, a multimillionaire businessman and active patron of the arts in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Alice married Albert Clifford Barney in 1876, after a short-lived engagement to celebrated African explorer Sir Henry Morton Stanley. Although her husband did not approve of her art interests, Alice went to Paris to study with John Singer Sargent's teacher, Carolus-Duran, and with the French pre-Raphaelite painter, Jean Jacques Henner in the fall of 1896-1897. A year later, she returned to Paris to study with expatriate American painter James MacNeill Whistler. Barney returned from her experience in Parisian salons intent on building a thriving arts center in the District that would cater to every member of society, not just the social elite. At the time, Washington, D.C., lacked an indigenous arts community or sufficient galleries to sponsor artists' work. Barney began to show her paintings in exhibitions with other prominent or up-and-coming Washington painters, including James Henry Mosher, Richard Norris Brooke, William Henry Holmes, and Hobart Nichols. In November 1901, she presented her first solo exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art's new Hemicycle gallery. Her unique, individual style moved her rapidly to a position of leadership in local art circles. Within a week of the Corcoran exhibition opening, she was elected vice-president of the Society of Washington Artists.
Barney also earned a reputation in Washington, D.C., for her lavishly detailed, artistically rendered ballets, mimes, tableaux, plays, and other theatrical productions. During World War I, Barney pushed for and convinced Congress to fund the building of the National Sylvan Theater on the grounds of the Washington Monument. The theater, dedicated on April 4, 1917, was the nation's first federally supported outdoor theater.
One of Barney's most important contributions to the Washington art scene was Studio House, located at Sheridan Circle and designed by architect Waddy B. Wood in 1902. During Barney's residence in Washington, D.C., the house functioned as her home, her art studio, and the District's cultural center. Elaborately decorated by Barney herself, the house hosted countless theatrical productions, art exhibitions, and visiting avant-garde artists. Her guest list included the Franklin Roosevelts and Cabot Lodges; Sarah Bernhardt and G. K. Chesterton; Admiral Dewey and the Levi Leiters; Emma Calve and Anna Pavlova; Alice Roosevelt and Chief Justice Harlan; President William H. Taft and Countess Cassini.
Barney also devoted her time and her gift for fund raising to Neighborhood House, a settlement house in southwest Washington, and to the women's suffrage cause. In 1914, she was elected president of the Washington branch of the newly founded Women's Peace Party, established by settlement house founder Jane Addams. In 1927, at age 70, Barney moved to Hollywood, California, to be near her oldest sister. There she continued her painting, opened a small theater called Theatre Mart, and wrote plays, including a rewrite of her daughter Natalie's play The Lighthouse, which won the Drama League of America contest in 1927. In 1931, at the age of 74, Alice Pike Barney died of a heart attack.
Alice's daughters, with whom she remained close, lived most of their lives in Paris. Natalie became an author of books of poetry and aphorisms in French. An outspoken lesbian, Natalie was a longtime lover of expatriate American artist Romaine Brooks. Laura married French lawyer Hippolyte Dreyfuss, was an early proponent of Bahaism, and an active campaigner for women's rights and world peace. She was made a chevalier and then an officier of the French Legion of Honor for her service to France during both World Wars. Both sisters died in Paris in their nineties.
In 1960, Natalie and Laura gave Studio House to the Smithsonian Institution for use as an arts and cultural center. The building initially housed offices and visiting scholars and guests. After renovation in 1980, Studio House was opened to the public for tours and entertainment events, including restagings of several of Alice Pike Barney's plays. In March 1995, the Smithsonian approved the pending sale of Barney Studio House, the proceeds to go toward the endowment fund for its National Museum of American Art.
For more biographical information, see Jean L. Kling's Alice Pike Barney, Her Life and Art (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994).

Notes
Personal Papers

Using the Collection
Prefered Citation
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7473, Alice Pike Barney Papers and Related Material

Keywords
Keywords table of terms and types.
Keyword Terms Keyword Types
Barney, Alice Pike, 1857-1931 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Dreyfus-Barney, Laura Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Pike, Samuel N., 1822-1872 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Carolus-Duran, 1837 or 8-1917 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Henner, Jean-Jacques, 1829-1905 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Whistler, James McNeill, 1834-1903 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Wood, Waddy B. (Waddy Butler), 1869-1944 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Bernhardt, Sarah, 1844-1923 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Barney, Natalie Clifford Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Stanley, Henry M. (Henry Morton), 1841-1904 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Barney, Albert Clifford Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Barney Studio House (Washington, D.C.) Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Society of Washington Artists (Washington, D.C.) Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
National Sylvan Theatre (Organization : Washington, D.C.) Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.) Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
National Museum of American Art (U.S.) Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Theatre Mart Ltd. Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Art Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Plays Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Theater Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Diaries Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Architectural drawings Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Manuscripts Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Clippings Genre/Form Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid

Repository Contact
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Washington, D.C.
Contact us at osiaref@si.edu