National Anthropological Archives

Guide to the Philleo Nash papers, 1931-1986

Summary
Collection ID:
NAA.1990-23
Creators:
Nash, Philleo, 1909-1987
Dates:
1931-1986
Languages:
English
.
Physical Description:
12 Linear feet
24 boxes
Repository:
The Philleo Nash papers attest to Nash's interest in anthropology, not only research and teaching but also in its application to public service. His papers can be separated into four main areas: undergraduate and graduate education, research, teaching, and public service. Files contain class notes from Nash's undergraduate and graduate studies as well as papers by well-known professors lecturing at the University of Chicago including Ralph Linton, Robert Redfield, and R.A. Radcliffe-Brown. The bulk of his research was conducted in the Pacific Northwest where he studied the Klamath-Modoc culture on the reservation, focusing on revivalism and socio-political organization (1935-1937). Other research included archeology at two sites, a study of the Toronto Jewish community, and a continuing interest in minority issues. Nash taugh at the University of Toronto (1937- 1941) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977). Teaching files contain lecture notes from his work at the University of Toronto. Public service files include correspondence from the period when he was Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin (1959-1961) as well as reports and photos from the years as Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1961-1966). Other public service and business positions are not represented in these files.

Scope and Contents
Scope and Contents
The Philleo Nash Papers attest to Nash's interest in anthropology, not only research and teaching but also in its application to public service. His papers can be separated into four main areas: undergraduate and graduate education, research, teaching, and public service. Files contain class notes from Nash's undergraduate and graduate studies as well as papers by well-known professors lecturing at the University of Chicago including Ralph Linton, Robert Redfield, and R.A. Radcliffe-Brown. The bulk of his research was conducted in the Pacific Northwest where he studied the Klamath-Modoc culture on the reservation, focusing on revivalism and socio-political organization (1935-1937). Other research included archeology at two sites, a study of the Toronto Jewish community, and a continuing interest in minority issues. Nash taugh at the University of Toronto (1937-1941) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977). Teaching files contain lecture notes from his work at the University of Toronto. Public service files include correspondence from the period when he was Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin (1959-1961) as well as reports and photos from the years as Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1961-1966). Other public service and business positions are not represented in these files.
Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.

Arrangement
Arrangement
Arranged in 6 series: (I) Education (1931-1937), (II) Klamath-Modoc Culture (1930s), (III) Teaching (1937-1942, 1971-1977), (IV) Miscellaneous (1936-1986), (V) Non-Academic Positions (1939-1970), (VI) Photos (1931-1967).

Biographical Note
Biographical Note
Philleo Nash was born on October 25, 1909, in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. He studied at the University of Wisconsin, taking a year off to study music at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. On his return to the University of Wisconsin, Nash completed his undergraduate degree in anthropology (1932) and went on to the University of Chicago for a Ph.D. in anthropology (1937). His doctoral dissertation explored the concepts of revivalism and social change with a focus on the Klamath Ghost Dance activities of the 1870s.
Nash held positions in teaching as well as in government and his family business. He was a lecturer in anthropology at the University of Toronto (1937-1941). He also lectured at the University of Wisconsin (1941-1942) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977).
From 1942 to 1953, Nash served in various positions in the federal government, first in the Office of War Information and later as Assistant to President Truman, focusing on minority affairs and as liaison to the Department of the Interior. During this period in Washington, Nash also acted as President of the Georgetown Day School (1945-1952), where he was one of the founders of this racially integrated cooperative school. In 1953, Nash returned to Wisconsin where his interest in politics continued, and he became Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin from 1959 to 1961. In 1961, he returned to Washington, DC as U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, a position he held until 1966.
Following his work as Commissioner, Nash remained in Washington where he acted as a consultant in applied anthropology and held offices in various associations including hte Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), the American Anthropological Association (AAA), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). During all the years of professional responsibilities, Nash also held positions in the family business, Biron Cranberry Company. He returned to Wisconsin in 1977 to be President and Manager of the Company.
Throughout his life Nash was active in various associations for science and anthropology. He was awarded the AAA's Distinguished Service Award in 1984. In 1986, the SfAA presented him with the Bronislaw Malinowski Award in recognition of outstanding scholarship and long term commitment in applying the social sciences to contemporary issues.
Philleo Nash died in 1987. Some years before his death Nash sent his archaeological research material from the Pound Village Site (1938-1939) to Toronto and his research material from the DuBay Village Site (1940) to the Milwaukee Public Museum. According to the terms of his will, his government and political papers are housed at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.
Reference: Landman, Ruth H. and Katherine S. Halpern (eds.). Applied Anthropologist and Public Servant: the Life and Work of Philleo Nash. NAPA Bulletin #7. Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association, 1989.

Administration
Author
Laura Lathrop

Using the Collection
Preferred Citation
Philleo Nash papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Conditions Governing Access
The Philleo Nash papers are open for research.
Access to the Philleo Nash papers requires an appointment.
Conditions Governing Use
Contact the repository for terms of use.

Related Materials
According to the terms of his will, Nash's government and political papers are housed at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.

Keywords
Keywords table of terms and types.
Keyword Terms Keyword Types
Sahnish (Arikara) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota] Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Arctic peoples Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Cocopa Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Colville Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Plateau Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Hualapai (Walapai) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
American Indians -- Religion Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Northeast Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Great Plains Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Indians of North America -- Subarctic Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Maya Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Oneida Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Jews -- Toronto, Ontario Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Eskimos Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Klamath Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Piipaash (Maricopa) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Spokan Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Walla Walla (Wallawalla) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
A:shiwi (Zuni) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Canada -- Ontario -- Lake Alymer -- archeology Geographic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Oraons Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Puyallup Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Akimel O'odham (Pima) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Samoan Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Quileute Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Shawnee Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Samoans Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Ghost dance -- Klamath Topical Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Sioux Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Hopi Pueblo Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Havasupai (Coconino) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Nativistic religions -- American Indians Topical Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Modoc Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Apache Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Diné (Navajo) Cultural Context Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Gower, Charlotte Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
DuBois, Cora -- Klamath notes (copies) Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
American Anthropological Association Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
East Bay Area United Indian Council -- Oakland, California Corporate Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Humphrey, Hubert Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Hill, W. W. (Willard Williams), 1902-1974 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Opler, Morris Edward Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Redfield, Robert, 1897-1958 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid

Repository Contact
National Anthropological Archives
Museum Support Center
4210 Silver Hill Road
Suitland, Maryland 20746
naa@si.edu