Guide to the Civil War Propaganda Scrapbooks
Digitized Content

Summary
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.1372
Creators:
Campbell, Jean H.
Dates:
1861 - 1861
Languages:
English
Collection is in English.
Physical Description:
0.15 Cubic feet
1 box
Repository:
This collection contains three scrapbooks filled with Civil War propaganda primarily from the North's perspective. The scrapbooks include illustrated envelopes as well as clippings from envelopes, magazines, and almanacs.

Scope and Contents
Scope and Contents
Three scrapbooks, into which propagandistic cartoons and images have been pasted. Many of the images are on envelopes, and the entire envelopes are pasted into the books. In other cases, images are clipped out and pasted in. With just three exceptions, the items in the scrapbooks are pro-Union and anti-Confederate. Few items are dated but the dates that are included are all 1861. Many of the items are patriotic, and contain images of the US flag, refer to the Constitution, praise Lincoln and various Union generals, or contain inspirational poetry. Most indicate confidence in an eventual Union victory, depict Lincoln, Union generals and Union soldiers as fearsome and heroic. Many others lampoon Jefferson Davis, with images depicting him, or Southerners in general, as the Devil or as one of various animals. Many violent images are included, some showing Jefferson Davis being executed.

Arrangement
Arrangement
Collection is arranged into one series.
Series 1: Scrapbooks, 1861

Biographical / Historical
Biographical / Historical
In the early years of the Civil War, pictorial envelopes were produced by printing companies, in both the North and the South. Other images came from sources such as almanacs and popular magazines. Propaganda in general was used to enhance morale among the soldiers and citizens that lived in the North and South. It helped spread the goals of both sides in simple terms that were exaggerated, dark, or even comical.
Northern printing companies created a profitable business, primarily printing envelopes that focused on preserving the Union. In the South, the propaganda and envelopes centered around the Confederate flag and what it stood for, but this was not continued at a steady rate throughout the war. Because they lacked manufacturing, the Confederacy was forced to import paper as well as ink from the North and England. This became a large problem for them when the North established the blockade, isolating the South from their usual imports. Ultimately, the North created more envelopes and designs than the South since it did not rely on imports to produce them.
Veronique Greenwood, "Civil War Envelopes are Works of Art – And Propaganda," National Geographic, December 10, 2015. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/12/151210-civil-war-envelopes-art-propaganda-artifacts/.

Administration
Processing Information
Collection was processed by Rebecca Kuske, 2016.
Author
Rebecca Kuske
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Collection donated by Jean H. Campbell, 2016.

Using the Collection
Preferred Citation
Civil War Propaganda Scrapbooks, 1861, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Conditions Governing Access
Collection is open for research.
Conditions Governing Use
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Custodial History
Custodial History
The donor was unsure which side of her family the scrapbooks came from or who compiled them.

Keywords
Keywords table of terms and types.
Keyword Terms Keyword Types
Propaganda Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Flags -- United States Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Patriotism Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Military Title Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Executions and executioners Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Devil Topic Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Cartoons (humorous images) Type Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Personal Name Search Smithsonian Collections Search ArchiveGrid

Repository Contact
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
P.O. Box 37012
Suite 1100, MRC 601
Washington, D.C. 20013-7012
archivescenter@si.edu
http://americanhistory.si.edu/archives