7845 records — Page 246 of 764
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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

The photograph depicts woman wearing traditional barkcloth 'negbe'. "The main item of women's clothing was a rectangular barkcloth garment called 'nogetwe'. Worn like a short skirt or sometimes like an apron, it was left open to reveal the 'negbe', or back apron. Women generally wore barkcloth when they were not at work and when strangers were pres...

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"In many cases carvers were also blacksmiths. Lang wrote in his field notes that the 'famous stools (nobarra),' carved from a single piece of wood, used by the Mangbetu women were made by special artists who enjoy a wide reputation. These stools accompany their owners (women only), on their visits and voyages and wherever they go. Important chiefs'...

[ ]
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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"In many cases carvers were also blacksmiths. Lang wrote in his field notes that the 'famous stools (nobarra),' carved from a single piece of wood, used by the Mangbetu women were made by special artists who enjoy a wide reputation. These stools accompany their owners (women only), on their visits and voyages and wherever they go. Important chiefs'...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"In many cases carvers were also blacksmiths. Lang wrote in his field notes that the 'famous stools (nobarra),' carved from a single piece of wood, used by the Mangbetu women were made by special artists who enjoy a wide reputation. These stools accompany their owners (women only), on their visits and voyages and wherever they go. Important chiefs'...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original title reads, "Male whipping contests in Mgbom Village square, associated with ikwum initiation form. Contest between Mgbom and Amuro villages at Mgbom. Females not allowed to see. Whippers from Elogo ward with their bundles of sticks. Arguments as to whether sticks are of correct size common, as well as general mayhem at the whipping event...

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1972
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"Among the Mangbetu, plantains replaced eleusine as a staple. In any newly cleared field, rapid growth plants such as maize and peanuts are planted in the first year among more slowly maturing plants such as plantain and manioc. In the second year the plantain and manioc generally occupy the field alone. Men do the heaviest work of clearing fields ...

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1972
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"Among the Mangbetu, plantains replaced eleusine as a staple. In any newly cleared field, rapid growth plants such as maize and peanuts are planted in the first year among more slowly maturing plants such as plantain and manioc. In the second year the plantain and manioc generally occupy the field alone. Men do the heaviest work of clearing fields ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

The photograph depicts women wearing traditional barkcloth 'negbe'. "The main item of women's clothing was a rectangular barkcloth garment called 'nogetwe'. Worn like a short skirt or sometimes like an apron, it was left open to reveal the 'negbe', or back apron. Women generally wore barkcloth when they were not at work and when strangers were pres...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"In many cases carvers were also blacksmiths. Lang wrote in his field notes that the 'famous stools (nobarra),' carved from a single piece of wood, used by the Mangbetu women were made by special artists who enjoy a wide reputation. These stools accompany their owners (women only), on their visits and voyages and wherever they go. Important chiefs'...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1972
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"Among the Mangbetu, plantains replaced eleusine as a staple. In any newly cleared field, rapid growth plants such as maize and peanuts are planted in the first year among more slowly maturing plants such as plantain and manioc. In the second year the plantain and manioc generally occupy the field alone. Men do the heaviest work of clearing fields ...

7845 records — Page 246 of 764