7845 records — Page 4 of 764
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Mgbom village, players practicing at home then moving out to Amuro Village. Walking through Mgbom Village before leaving for other villages to parade. One of the players at left carries a bottle of European wine for the elders of Amebo ward, Mgbom Village, sitting in their ward rest house (obiogo)....

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Masked akparakpa dancers, the younger members of the play, the first one possibly with a opa nwa (carry-child) mask. The akparakpa pl...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers preceded by opa nwa mask player. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. One of the player wears the opa nwa mas...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. One of the okumkpa play leaders wearing an old style mask of the Ego people, who probably were one of the original non-Igbo inhabitan...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts nnade okumkpa mask only worn by senior and junior okumkpa leaders, and occasionally by assistant leaders. The two leaders, okumkpa odudo, wear a floppy, wide-brimmed mat hat and are easily identifiable amongst the players by their special dress and actions. They do not sit down and do not usually dance about. The two men are ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Mgbom village, players practicing at home then moving out to Amuro Village. Center masquerader dressed as a Muslim. Afikpo is largely Christiam and indigenous beliefs, but one southern Afikpo village, Anohia, partly coverted to Islam in the 1950s, creating a lot of tension in Afikpo." [Ottenberg fi...

Publication caption reads, "Two small boys toward the end of an njenji parade line wearing acali mask."

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts headgear of an erewe player. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Interspersed with them ar...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts ebulu players dancing around akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a fe...

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[ ]
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-pie...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, which occurs in various villages, those of each community parading in their own and also in other villages. The rainy season festival day, iko okoci. They parade by age, generally, with some exceptions, from older to younger males by grades. Njenje is general term for this masquerade, and particularly ...

Publication caption reads, "Igri players dancing about in an njenji parade at Ndibe Village common."

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

The photograph depicts several dancers wearing the Afikpo form of the igri mask of madness and youthful exuberance. In their left hands they carry a sticklike apparatus known as egede. The igri players draw attention to the line of wood-masked players that follow them.

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[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Okumkpa performance at Mgbom Village square. The masker with a red plume on top is the 'Queen' masquerader, as the Afikpo call it in English, and wears the upa nwa (carry-child) mask. When he comes out to dance the performance is over." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

Publication caption reads, "Skit of the girl who refuses to marry in the 1952 Amuro okumkpa play. The player is wearing the opa nwa mask. His 'mother' is just in back of him, the two play leaders are to his right. The father of the man playing the girl is approaching him from his left to give him a 'dash'."

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers preceded by opa nwa mask player. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. One of the player wears the opa nwa mas...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-pie...

7845 records — Page 4 of 764