7845 records — Page 41 of 764
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Yam heaps in the Ikwo Village-Group area, near Abakaliki Township, some miles north of Afikpo Village-Group. Such yam heaps may be four or more feet high, the base flooded in the rainy season, producing huge yams." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part II].

"The long broad valleys tend to become swamp during the rainy season, but the best farmlands are there. The practice of planting crops in large mounds of earth prevents their roting during the wetter periods. The afikpo are mainly agriculturists. The basic subsistence crops are yam, coco yam, and cassava, which are also the main cash crop. Yams, th...

[ ]
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[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "The so-called 'horse funeral' (memorial or second funeral) done by Oteleri, Amachara Village. Performed by the eldest son, Oteleri, many years after his father's death, when he became ill, and a diviner indicated his father's spirit was angry at the neglect. Often is performed after a few years. Women dancing at the Afikpo ma...

"When a mature male dies his eldest son is responsible for burial and the funeral ceremony. The burial is followed by a series of related rituals, which generally continue to express the relative positions of the descent groups. The first is the 'goat funeral'. This ceremony is followed by the ritual of placing a shrine pot for the deceased in his ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Yam heaps alongside the road on the way to Okpoha Village-Group , northwest of Afikpo. But with a similar Igbo culture. Yams have not started to spout as yet. Note the lush greenery." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part II].

"The long broad valleys tend to become swamp during the rainy season, but the best farmlands are there. The practice of planting crops in large mounds of earth prevents their roting during the wetter periods. The afikpo are mainly agriculturists. The basic subsistence crops are yam, coco yam, and cassava, which are also the main cash crop. Yams, th...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "The so-called 'horse funeral' (memorial or second funeral) done by Oteleri, Amachara Village. Performed by the eldest son, Oteleri, many years after his father's death, when he became ill, and a diviner indicated his father's spirit was angry at the neglect. Often is performed after a few years. Women dancing, Amachara Villag...

"When a mature male dies his eldest son is responsible for burial and the funeral ceremony. The burial is followed by a series of related rituals, which generally continue to express the relative positions of the descent groups. The first is the 'goat funeral'. This ceremony is followed by the ritual of placing a shrine pot for the deceased in his ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Women firing pots the traditional way, piling them together, covering them with dry long grass and lghting this. Mgbom village. These are good-sized waterpots. Some of them will be used locally, others will be shipped by canoe down the Cross River from Ndibe Beach for sale, generally to Calabar. Women are scantily dress for t...

"Many compounds have a pot-burning field (ohoho) under the direction of the senior women of the compound. pot firing is done on an open circular ground area behind the quarters, using dried grass and brush. The burning grounds are forbidden to men by lineage rules, and women until recently did not wear cloths during the firing." [Ottenberg, 1968: D...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Entrance to Ezi Agbe compound, Ukpa Village, with new abo egala. Center roofing section newly laid on." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"The compound is called Ezi followed by the name of its founder, who is also usually the original ancestor of the patrilineage. As we approach the compound from the village common, on which it usually faces, we see a narrow roofed entrance from which hangs a protective shrine, egbo. The compound is normally separated from the village common by mud ...

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[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Women firing pots the traditional way, piling them together, covering them with dry long grass and lghting this. Mgbom village. These are good-sized waterpots. Some of them will be used locally, others will be shipped by canoe down the Cross River from Ndibe Beach for sale, generally to Calabar. Women are scantily dress for t...

"Many compounds have a pot-burning field (ohoho) under the direction of the senior women of the compound. pot firing is done on an open circular ground area behind the quarters, using dried grass and brush. The burning grounds are forbidden to men by lineage rules, and women until recently did not wear cloths during the firing." [Ottenberg, 1968: D...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "The so-called 'horse funeral' (memorial or second funeral) done by Oteleri, Amachara Village. Performed by the eldest son, Oteleri, many years after his father's death, when he became ill, and a diviner indicated his father's spirit was angry at the neglect. Often is performed after a few years. Waiting for the dancing to beg...

"When a mature male dies his eldest son is responsible for burial and the funeral ceremony. The burial is followed by a series of related rituals, which generally continue to express the relative positions of the descent groups. The first is the 'goat funeral'. This ceremony is followed by the ritual of placing a shrine pot for the deceased in his ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Bush behind Obiogo Maka, Agbogo ward, Mgbom Village." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"Immediately beyond the houses in the compounds, frequently on a downward slope, is the osoho area, farmed by persons whose houses are nearby, and where garbage dumps and latrines are often located. Beyond osoho, but rarely exceeding a mile in width, is the ebo area, consisting of trees, gardens, small farms, and in some case open grasslands. The e...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Women firing pots the traditional way, piling them together, covering them with dry long grass and lghting this. Mgbom village. These are good-sized waterpots. Some of them will be used locally, others will be shipped by canoe down the Cross River from Ndibe Beach for sale, generally to Calabar. Women are scantily dress for t...

"Many compounds have a pot-burning field (ohoho) under the direction of the senior women of the compound. pot firing is done on an open circular ground area behind the quarters, using dried grass and brush. The burning grounds are forbidden to men by lineage rules, and women until recently did not wear cloths during the firing." [Ottenberg, 1968: D...

7845 records — Page 41 of 764