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Level:
series
Collection ID:
Record Unit 7179
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

On June 20, 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt wrote Charles D. Walcott, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution concerning Roosevelt's proposed trip to Africa. Roosevelt offered to take two naturalist-taxidermists selected by the United States National Museum (USNM) for the purpose of caring for specimens that might be acquired. ...

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Creators:
Green, Edward C. (Edward Crocker), 1944-
Dates:
circa 1970-2016
Size:
8.12 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Collection ID:
NAA.2016-31
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

The papers of Edward C. Green, circa 1970-2016, document his work as an applied medical anthropologist and research consultant focusing principally on the distribution and prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in Africa and South America. Much of Green's research and policy focus lay in understanding indigenous health belief systems and instituting locally-designed approaches to major health concerns. The collection consists of correspondence, field diaries and typed research, sound recordings, photographs, and published reports and articles, including material from his dissertation research among the Matawai Maroons of Suriname.

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Creators:
Conant, Francis
Dates:
1946-2011
bulk 1953-2008
Size:
20 Linear feet ((43 boxes) plus 25 digital storage media and 5 map folders )
Collection ID:
NAA.2012-13
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.

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Creators:
Reining, Priscilla
Dates:
1916-2007
bulk 1934-2007
Size:
2 flat boxes
60.25 Linear Feet (145 boxes)
23 computer storage devices (floppy discs, zip discs, data tapes, and magnetic tape)
6 sound recordings
2 map drawers
Collection ID:
NAA.2009-25
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

The Priscilla Reining papers, 1916-2007, primarily document the professional life of Reining, a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men. The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records. Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection.

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Dates:
undated
Level:
file
Collection ID:
NAA.1991-04
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

-Robert L. Cooper et al., Language survey of Ethiopia, Part II Language use in Ethiopia, drafts of chapters 6-9, 23 -Kenneth Little, "Methodology in the study of African women's urban roles," draft of paper -__________, "The women of Africa," The Nation, 1973 February 26 -Jean Morrison, Report of visit to the University Colleges of the Universit...

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Creators:
Donaldson, Jeff, 1932-2004
Dates:
1918-2005
bulk 1960s-2005
Size:
12.5 Linear feet
Collection ID:
AAA.donajeff
Repository:
Archives of American Art

The papers of African American artist and educator Jeff Donaldson measure 12.5 linear feet and date from 1918 to 2005, with the bulk of the records dating from the 1960s to 2005. The collection documents Donaldson's work as a professional artist, his academic career at Howard University, and his leadership role in the Black Arts Movement through biographical material, a small amount of professional and personal correspondence, personal business records, writings by Donaldson and others, research files, artist files, sound recordings of interviews Donaldson conducted with over 40 artists, teaching files, exhibition files, printed material, and photographs. Also found are detailed records of his professional activities and leadership roles in AfriCOBRA, CONFABA, FESTAC, and the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC), including documentation on the Wall of Respect mural.

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