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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Nne Mgbe (mother of Mgbe), a name whose origin is forgotten, somewhat similar to the white-faced beke (white person) mask, and sometimes confused with it. Porcupine quills. He has come out to dance individually, though others may do so as well at the same time. Or he has come out to seek a 'dash' from me." [Ottenberg field ...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers preceded by opa nwa mask player. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. One of the player wears the opa nwa mas...

The photograph depicts ori dancer with nne mgbo mask. Although it is occasionally worn at the okumkpa play with the dark raffia ori costume to portray a woman in one of the skits, it is also one of the favorite masks worn by young adult males, who come out and dance individually between skits and serve as an important and clearly male group.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-pie...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts ebulu players dancing around akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-piece iron gong, egele; a fe...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

Publication title reads, "Erewe player dancing before musicians at Ukpa village oje ogwu dance."

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe player dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-pie...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts ebulu players, entering the village common. The ebulu players are the poorer and generally younger dancers who move only as a dancing group. Their costumes involve a similar body costume and net mask to the erewe, but the headpiece differs. On the head is worn a red cloth, which is peaked and surrounded by feathers, more vert...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe player dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians as well as ebulu players, entering the village common. The musicians all wore a dark brown net mask with black lines on it, and a variety of head coverings. Some had porcupine quill hats (ebi) and some headpieces of feathers, called okpu ebuba (hat-feather). Most of them played the single-pie...

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Level:
series
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.1974
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
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Creators:
Levi, Julian E. (Julian Edwin), 1900-1982
Dates:
1846-1981
Size:
6.9 Linear feet
Collection ID:
AAA.levijuli
Repository:
Archives of American Art

The papers of painter and teacher Julian E. (Edwin) Levi date from 1846 to 1981, and comprise 6.9 linear feet. They include biographical information and extensive correspondence with museums and galleries, as well as letters written to his family, circa 1927, while Levi was living in Paris. Also found within the papers are scattered drawings and sketches by Levi, writings and notes, financial records, two scrapbooks, printed material, miscellaneous records and photographs that document Levi's professional career and personal life.

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