8501 records — Page 770 of 824
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe player, bringing "dashes" to the musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freedom. Inte...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Same skit about the Moslems of Anohia Village. The man with the white head cloth is supposed to be the founder of the Afikpo Anohia Village Moslem group, Alhaji Ibrahim, born of that village, who left as a young man, converted to Islam in Senegal, has been to Mecca." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December ...

Publication caption reads, "Skit concerning Moslems at the Mgbom okumkpa in 1960. The actors are wearing okpesu umuruma masks. The two play leaders are in the background."

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts ori players acting out a skit. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Reconstructing the patrilineal ancestral rest house (obu), Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. Digging the foundation." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series, December 1951-March 1953].

"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands an...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Reconstructing the patrilineal ancestral rest house (obu), Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. Otosi. Shrine for the obu, Nkpeta in back." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands an...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Okumkpa performance at Mgbom Village square. The oldest Akparakpa dancers, who are still quite young men." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers wearing mba masks. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. These boys and young men wear the mba costume and mba...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa masquerade play, Amorie Village square. The masqueraders are from Amorie Village. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Okpesu umuroma (frighten-children)mask, also called ihu ori (face-evil)." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series, December 1951-March 1953].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts Okepesu umuruma mask, also called ihu ori. Common to the okumkpa play, the okpesu umuruma is a favorite mask of the older players who, wearing the dark ori costume, dance individually betwen the skits and may also be actors. Okumkpa musicians sometimes wear an ugly mask. The mask stands for greediness and the self-interest of...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Reconstructing the patrilineal ancestral rest house (obu), Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. Digging the foundation. The covered up pole is the otosi shrine." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands an...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "The eldest man in the compound, a member of the senior Afikpo age group Oni Ekara, laying the foundation stone in the construction of the patrilineal ancestral shrine house, obu in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. His age rank is indicated by the red cap he wears. Under this stone the founder of Ezi Akputa is said to have ...

"The Afikpo elders, Nde ici ehugbo (people-old-Afikpo), form one large grade that is the major traditional ruling element in Afikpo today. This elders' grade is divided into three subgrades and age category. Among the three, the senior subgrade, oni ekara, consists of very elderly individuals from various parts of Afikpo. The oni ekara wear knit re...

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[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Masquerades on days following whipping day contests, Mgbom Village. Hihi masqueraders, on orie day, a form that looks like logholo, unusual compared to logholo, in that nobody plays with it, no chasing, it only dances. Fiber netted mask, raffia dress, ikpo metal bell hanging on chest." [Ottenberg field research notes, Septe...

"There is an annual form of initiation called isubu eda, which is found only in the Itim subgroup of the Afikpo villages. In this form the boys are initiated in a forest bush area one evening, spend the night in the common, and are free to leave the next morning. For the next six orie days those boys from the home village who are initiated into isu...

The photograph depicts hihi masked performers. The net mask is dark and usually has a headpiece, called ekoro. A raffia dress is worn from the shoulders to the feet. The hihi like to dance about together, shoulder to shoulder, singing the songs used in the annual whipping ritual day in the village.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, Ndibe Village, but with players from Mgbom. Other masqueraders in various masks dressed in modern or other styles. More players, mainly couples." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

The photograph depicts, at the rear of the parade column, several couples including agbogho masqueraders wearing the ceremonial hairdo of unmarried girls. This consists of five black twists, one at the center, the other four each at a corner, coming upward a foot or more from the head and connected at the tips by pink yarn.

8501 records — Page 770 of 824