8501 records — Page 777 of 824
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe and ebulu players, performing in a single circle, one group following the other, moving counterclockwise. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

Publication title reads, "Erewe players dancing at Ukpe oje ogwu dance."

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe players dancing before akopia eka (knock-hand) musicians. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

Publication title reads, "Erewe dancers at the oje ogwu dance, Ukpa village, 1960."

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe players, performing as a group in the dancing area. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from the top of the head, which move about with some freed...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Okumkpa performance at Mgbom Village square. Players first coming out as a group into the village square. The leader has an older Okumkpa leader's mask though he is not a main leader. He is called egwale, and is one of two men who sits down with the masked performers just near or in back of the musicians, who sit in front, ...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Okumkpa performance at Mgbom Village square. Players first coming out as a group into the village square. The leader has an older Okumkpa leader's mask though he is not a main leader. He is called egwale, and is one of two men who sits down with the masked performers just near or in back of the musicians, who sit in front, ...

Publication caption reads, "Players, led by an assistant leader, coming out to village common for the Mgbom okumkpa play in 1960."

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Nne Mgbe (mother of Mgbe), a name whose origin is forgotten, somewhat similar to the white-faced beke (white person) mask, and sometimes confused with it. Porcupine quills. He has come out to dance individually, though others may do so as well at the same time. Or he has come out to seek a 'dash' from me." [Ottenberg field ...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers preceded by opa nwa mask player. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. One of the player wears the opa nwa mas...

The photograph depicts ori dancer with nne mgbo mask. Although it is occasionally worn at the okumkpa play with the dark raffia ori costume to portray a woman in one of the skits, it is also one of the favorite masks worn by young adult males, who come out and dance individually between skits and serve as an important and clearly male group.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Skit about the Moslems in Anohia Village, taken from in back of the seated players." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts ori players acting out a skit. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original title reads, "Amuro Village Okumkpa play. A humorous skit about a man taking yams from a yarn barn. these 'barns' are wooden racks to store yams outside of the village." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

Publication title reads, "Masquerader taking yams from yam racks during skit in Amuro okumkpa of 1960."

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts ori players acting out a skit. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"The Wagenia derive their fame as fisherman from the way in which they have turned the opportunities offered them by their natural environment to account. At the point where they live, the river narrows considerably and drops in a series of rapids and cataracts over a several metres high, hard rocky ledge which appears above the surface here. A spe...

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1970
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"The Wagenia derive their fame as fisherman from the way in which they have turned the opportunities offered them by their natural environment to account. At the point where they live, the river narrows considerably and drops in a series of rapids and cataracts over a several metres high, hard rocky ledge which appears above the surface here. A spe...

8501 records — Page 777 of 824