8501 records — Page 782 of 824
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Ibibio mask, female. Generally one can tell the difference between male and female by the hair style." [Ottenberg field research note...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts dancer wearing female ibibio mask and using the dark raffia ori costume. Players in the skits wear this mask to represent an adult woman or at other time a man, and okumkpa musicians sometimes use it as well. The name refers to the fact that Afikpo consider it of Ibibio design and origin. The carving is both purchased by Afik...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Akparakpa dancers, younger members of the play, wearing mba masks." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series, December 1951-March 19...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers wearing mba masks. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. These boys and young men wear the mba costume and mba...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Reconstructing the patrilineal ancestral rest house (obu), Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. Logs from the old obu house, with dry mud blocks from old obu which will be employed elsewhere, in the background." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands an...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, Ndibe Village, but with players from Mgbom. Younger players dressed as males or females in modern dress." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

Publication caption reads, "Players dressed as married women at an njenji performance, followed by a variety of costumed masqueraders."

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Mgbom njenje parade players at Ndibe Village." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

Publication caption reads, "Young boys players at an njenji parade."

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1978-1980
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2005-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research in northern Sierra Leone within Bafodea Town, the capital of Wara Wara Bafodea Chiefdom, while on an Art Historical and Anthropological Field Research from October of 1978 through July of 1980.

Original title reads, "At Bafodea Town. Boys' pre-initiation dancing (gbondokali) Friday evening, both before dressed up and after dressed up. In front of Bafodea Chief's house. Boys have been to a bush area outside of Bafodea Town and have been dressed up by male helpers and carried back to the Chief's house where the crowd is waiting on the shoul...

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[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Reconstruction of the ancestral rest house (obu) in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village. Nnale breaking stones for use in the obu construction." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].

"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands an...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Mgbom Village Njenje masquerade players parading at Ndibe Village, Okposi slave trader, also called the Aro man. Alocho Uzo of Mgbom is the player. Masquerader is wearing an okpesu umuruma (frighten-children) or also called ihu ori (face-ugly) mask, often in Afikpo masquerades." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 19...

Publication caption reads, "Njenji parade player dressed as an Aro man, with okpesu umuruma mask."

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Masked akparakpa dancers, the younger members of the play, the first one possibly with a opa nwa (carry-child) mask. The akparakpa pl...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts akparakpa dancers preceded by opa nwa mask player. The akparakpa dancers sing as part of the chorus, and at set intervals in the play they come out and dance counterclockwise in a circle around the remainder of the chorus. The akparakpa are dressed to represent young, unmarried females. One of the player wears the opa nwa mas...

[ ]
Collapse
[ ]
Expand
Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Okumkpa players sitting with an upa nwa (carry or hold-child) masker with violet plume, popularly called in English a 'Queen' mask." ...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts a view of the chorus made of ori and akparakpa dancers. In foreground, player wearing mkpe mask. The term mkpe means horn and the major but not common form is a goat (ewu). Opa nwa, acali, beke, and mba mask forms can also be seen.

8501 records — Page 782 of 824