8503 records — Page 788 of 824
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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Mgbom village, players practicing at home then moving out to Amuro Village. Walking through Mgbom Village before leaving for other villages to parade. One of the players at left carries a bottle of European wine for the elders of Amebo ward, Mgbom Village, sitting in their ward rest house (obiogo)....

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Mgbom Village Njenje masquerade players parading at Ndibe Village, Okposi slave trader, also called the Aro man. Alocho Uzo of Mgbom is the player. Masquerader is wearing an okpesu umuruma (frighten-children) or also called ihu ori (face-ugly) mask, often in Afikpo masquerades." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 19...

"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side ...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Oje Ogwu ceremony presented on the eke day of 3 January 1960 in the main common of Ukpa Village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Oje Ogwu ceremony at Ukpa Village. Note the different styles of dresses. String netted masks. Musicians wearing the same, some with dry leaves, some with fresh ones, some with feathers, some without. Some use porcupine quills. Ebi is what dress called if wear porcupine quills, okpu ebuba (hat-feather) is what call other mus...

"Oje Ogwu is a play performed in only a few common villages each year. It is a net-masked dance of about thirty players accompanied by musicians also wearing net face coverings. Most of the Ezi Akane secret society members from the age group of boys and young men took part in the actual rehearsals and performances. The Oje Ogwu dance is simpler tha...

The photograph depicts erewe players, holding a long stick in their right hands while entering the dancing area for the first time. The erewe players are the better and generally older dancers who perform individually as well as in the group. Their characteristic headgear consists of long, black feathers pointing out in different directions from th...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Skit, palaver over a cow. A small wood prop is used for it." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts ori players acting out a skit. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Masqueraders with blue dress and white faced mask is dressed as a female, and as always at Afikpo as well, attracts attention." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].

"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without c...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1959-1960
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.

Original caption reads, "At this point in the Mgbom Okumkpa there is usually a skit about someone who is ill and gets cured. Here it is a boy. Skit called adawa. He falls down and collapses. Comes out, dances, falls down. Then a masker acting as a diviner (dibia) comes out to cure him and he gets up a dances around before joining the seated group. ...

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts ori players acting out a skit. They are the principal actors in the skits. They also come out and dance as individuals between some of the events. The ori are active singers in the chorus. They are experienced players, as a rule, having taken part in previous performances.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Female ibibio style mask. A form derived from the Ibibio people some distance south of Afikpo, but now made at Afikpo. Differs from A...

Publication title reads, "Player in ori costume and ibibio mask at the Amuro okumkpa, 1952."

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts dancer wearing ibibio mask and using the dark raffia ori costume. Players in the skits wear this mask to represent an adult woman or at other time a man, and okumkpa musicians sometimes use it as well. The name refers to the fact that Afikpo consider it of Ibibio design and origin. The carving is both purchased by Afikpo in I...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1951-1953
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the okumkpa presented on the eke Sunday afternoon of 13 January 1952 in the main common of Amuro village. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.

Original title reads, "Okumkpa play, Amuro village, Amuro players. Each village has its own players, although players may perform in other villages as well. The name of the mask is also the name for the entire dress. Ibibio mask, female." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series, December 1951-March 1953].

"Okumpka, the most elaborate masquerade found at Afikpo Village-Group, is the most popular and well attended Afikpo masked ritual. It consists of a series of skits, songs, and dances presented by masked players in the main common of a village during of an afternoon or evening. The play is closely associated with the village secret society; all play...

The photograph depicts dancer wearing female ibibio mask and using the dark raffia ori costume. Players in the skits wear this mask to represent an adult woman or at other time a man, and okumkpa musicians sometimes use it as well. The name refers to the fact that Afikpo consider it of Ibibio design and origin. The carving is both purchased by Afik...

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
1978-1980
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2005-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research in northern Sierra Leone within Bafodea Town, the capital of Wara Wara Bafodea Chiefdom, while on an Art Historical and Anthropological Field Research from October of 1978 through July of 1980.

Original title reads, "At Bafodea Town. Boys' pre-initiation dancing (gbondokali) Friday evening, both before dressed up and after dressed up. In front of Bafodea Chief's house. Boys have been to a bush area outside of Bafodea Town and have been dressed up by male helpers and carried back to the Chief's house where the crowd is waiting on the shoul...

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Creators:
Elisofon, Eliot
Dates:
1971
Level:
item
Size:
1 Slide (col.)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1973-001
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

"The Wagenia derive their fame as fisherman from the way in which they have turned the opportunities offered them by their natural environment to account. At the point where they live, the river narrows considerably and drops in a series of rapids and cataracts over a several metres high, hard rocky ledge which appears above the surface here. A spe...

8503 records — Page 788 of 824