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Dates:
undated
Level:
file
Collection ID:
AAA.ashtdore
Repository:
Archives of American Art
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Level:
file
Collection ID:
AAG.GCA
Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
Ruth Selig was interviewed by Pam Henson on July 5, 1996. Selig was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1942. She earned her bachelors degree in history at Wellesley College and then spent two years in teacher training, first at Shady Hill School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and then at Harvard, where she earned her Masters of Arts in Teaching in history and social sciences. Selig also holds a masters degree in anthropology from George Washington University (GWU). Selig taught in secondary education for ten years before coming to work at the Smithsonian in July 1975. She began her Smithsonian career in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). From 1978-1983, Selig was primarily focused on the teacher training courses in anthropology which she helped to design and run. She then moved to Wyoming in June 1983 and created a similar program there, in conjunction with the Smithsonian. Returning to Washington, DC, Selig resumed her work at the Smithsonian in 1985. Shortly thereafter, she became the special assistant to Jim Tyler, Deputy Director and Acting Director of the NMNH. Next, Selig worked for Bob Hoffman in the Director's office. As Hoffman was promoted to Assistant Secretary of Research, Selig moved with him. Selig is now a Program Officer in the Office of the Provost. This interview discusses Selig's education; the work she does currently; how she came to the Smithsonian; her first job at the Smithsonian and its challenges; the expansion of her position to include education kits; the temporary loss of her job; her work on the book Smithsonian Experience; her work in creating and facilitating a teacher training program in anthropology with GWU colleagues; her continuing work on education kits; he rmove to Wyoming and how she started and ran a similar teacher training program at the University of Wyoming; her return to Washington, DC, and the Smithsonian; the course of her career since her return; her close work with Jim Tyler and Bob Hoffman; how her job changed each time she moved; the numerous projects in which she has been involved, notably the first McKinsey study; and the beginning of Anthro Notes and its continuing success. The interview continues with Selig's assessment of her educational work at the Smithsonian, the Smithsonian as compared to public schools and universities, and her father as her role model. Selig's interview mentions colleagues Bill Fitzhugh, William Sturtevant, Ann Bay, Jack Ewers, Herman Viola, Bruce Craig, Cordelia Benedict, Ann Hough, Jim Mello, George Frison, Loretta Fowler, Dick Fiske, Bob Hoffman, Jim Tyler, Stan Shetler, Ann Levin, Dan Goodwin, and Ross Simons and discusses their work in connection with her own.
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Level:
file
Collection ID:
Record Unit 9594
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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