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Creators:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956
Sinclair, David
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Dates:
1939 October
Size:
22 Negatives (photographic)
Collection ID:
NMAI.AC.001.055
Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian

Photography taken by George Heye, Joseph Keppler, David Sinclair and William Stiles during a trip to the Cornplanter Reservation in Pennsylvania and Onondaga, Allegheny, Cattaraugus, Tuscarora, and Tonawanda Reservations in New York October 1939.

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Creators:
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937
Chew, William
Cornplanter, Jesse J.
Haag, Mack
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Dates:
1886-ca. 1935
Size:
2 Boxes
Collection ID:
NAA.MS4271
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

Contents: 1. Letters received from other anthropologists and the public, with a few copies of letters sent, 1886- ca. 1933. Alphabetically arranged. 2. Letters received from Indians of the Onondaga, Tonowanda, and Tuscarora Reservations, with a few copies of letters sent, ca. 1902-ca. 1935. Alphabetically arranged. 3. Letters received from India...

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Creators:
Milch Gallery
Dates:
1911-1995
Size:
42.2 Linear feet
Collection ID:
AAA.milcgall
Repository:
Archives of American Art

The records of Milch Gallery measure 42.5 linear feet and date from 1911-1995. Edward Milch (1865-1953) opened the Edward Milch Gallery in New York City. In 1916, he formed a partnership with his brother Albert Milch (1881-1951), a gilder and framer, creating E. & A. Milch, Inc., a gallery specializing in American art. Harold C. Milch (1904-1981), Albert's son, was appointed a partner in 1944 and continued the business until his death. Business records of Milch Gallery, 1911-1968, include correspondence, sales records, inventories, financial records, printed matter, photographs, and legal documents. Later additions to the records date from 1922-1995 and include correspondence; artists' files; financial, sales, and stock records; printed material; and photographs.

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Creators:
Basie, Count, 1904-
Smith, Ernie
Webster, Ben
Armstrong, Louis, 1901-1971
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Dates:
1894-1979
Size:
30 Cubic feet (352 film reels , 16 mm)
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.0491
Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

More than 300 reels of 16mm black and white and color film, silent and sound, fiction and documentary motion picture film documenting jazz and related musical performances, social and popular dance styles and performances, jazz musicians, performance locales, and documentation of African-American popular culture. A list of featured performers in the collection is shown below. The films are frequently compilations produced by Smith for lectures.

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Creators:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961
Dates:
1907-1959 (some earlier)
Size:
683 Linear feet
Collection ID:
NAA.1976-95
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

Harrington was a Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist involved in the study of over one hundred American tribes. His speciality was linguistics. Most of the material concerns California, southwestern, northwestern tribes and includes ethnological, archeological, historical notes; writings, correspondence, photographs, sound recordings, biological specimens, and other types of documents. Also of concern are general linguistics, sign language, writing systems, writing machines, and sound recordings machines. There is also some material on New World Spanish, Old World languages. In addition, there are many manuscripts of writings that Harrington sketched, partially completed, or even completed but never published. The latter group includes not only writings about anthropological subjects but also histories, ranging from a biography of Geronimo to material on the history of the typewriter. The collection incorporates material of Richard Lynch Garner, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, and others. In his field work, Harrington seems sometimes to have worked within fairly firm formats, this especially being true when he was "rehearing" material, that is in using an informant to verify and correct the work of other researchers. Often, however, the interviews with informants (and this seems to have been the case even with some "rehearings") seem to have been rather free form, for there is a considerable intertwining of subjects. Nevertheless, certain themes frequently appear in his work, including annotated vocabularies concerning flora and fauna and their use, topography, history and biography, kinship, cosmology (including tribal astronomy), religion and philosophy, names and observations concerning neighboring tribes, sex and age division, material culture, legends, and songs. The fullness of such materials seems to have been limited only by the time Harrington had to spend with a goup and the knowledge of his informants.

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