60 records — Page 1 of 6
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Creators:
National Museum of American History. Program in African American Culture
Dates:
1976-1999
Size:
8.5 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Collection ID:
Accession 12-358
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

This accession consists of the records of the Program in African American Culture (PAAC), with earlier records dating from when PAAC was known as the Program in African American History and the Program in Black American Culture, respectively. The records primarily document planning for conferences and symposiums, such as "Will the Circle ...

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Creators:
Mathis, Nathaniel, 1946- (barber, motivational speaker)
Dates:
1946-2004
bulk 1970-2004
Size:
5.5 Cubic feet (18 boxes, 1 oversize folder)
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.0641
Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Nathaniel Mathis is a Washington, D.C., hairstylist, inventor, motivational speaker, and entrepreneur. His papers document his business life and community involvement.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum
Dates:
1942-1998
Size:
21.6 Cubic feet (consisting of 17 cartons, 2 oversized boxes.)
Collection ID:
ACMA.03-027
Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives

These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of an exhibition exploring the immigration of people of African descent from Central and South America and the Caribbean to the Washington Metropolitan Area. The show was organized and hosted by the Anacostia Museum from August 21, 1994 through August 7, 1995. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
July 1-10, 1994
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.1994
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Medicine, Beatrice
Dates:
1914, 1932-1949, 1952-2003 (bulk dates, 1945-2003).
Size:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Collection ID:
NAA.1997-05
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.

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Creators:
Jones, Caroline Robinson, 1942-2001 (advertising executive)
Dates:
1942 - 1996
Size:
15 Sound tape reels
4 motion picture films
54 Cubic feet (127 boxes; one oversize folder)
129 video recordings
70 cassette tapes
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.0552
Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Caroline R. Jones (1942-2001), an African-American advertising executive, worked for a number of prominent New York ad agencies and and founded her own firm in 1986. She is best known for her work in assisting clients in marketing to minority consumers. The collection includes client files, print advertisements, and radio and television commercials created for a wide range of commercial and public service campaigns.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
June 23-July 4, 1995
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.1995
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
June 26-July 7, 2013
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.2013
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
June 23-July 4, 1999
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.1999
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Drewal, Henry John
Drewal, Margaret Thompson
Dates:
1970-1989
Size:
10,000 Slides (color)
10,617 copy slides
Collection ID:
EEPA.1992-028
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993). Photographs taken by Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal during the 1970s and 1980s of Yoruba and Ewe art and culture.

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60 records — Page 1 of 6