7 records — Page 1 of 1
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Creators:
Lemelson Center
Dates:
2001-2003, 2006
Size:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Collection ID:
Accession 10-130
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

This accession consists of records documenting programs and projects developed by the Lemelson Center. The first program included is: "Crossroads: Historical Perspectives on Topics Related to September 11," a monthly series of conversations with the public featuring scholars and other specialists on topics related to the events of September ...

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Creators:
Lemelson Center
Dates:
1995-2014
Size:
29 cu. ft. (27 record storage boxes) (4 document boxes)
Collection ID:
Accession 16-092
Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

This accession consists of audio and visual recordings of Lemelson Center special events, exhibitions, symposia, and general activities used for broadcast. Major programs documented within this collection include "Nobel Voices: Celebrating 100 Years of the Nobel Prize;" "Lewis Latimer: Renaissance Man;" "Reinventing the Wheel: The Continuing ...

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Creators:
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924
Lumholtz, Carl, 1851-1922
Dates:
1898-1902
Size:
588 Photographic prints
190 copy negatives
Collection ID:
NMAI.AC.103
Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian

This collection contains photographic prints and copy negatives taken by Ales Hrdlicka in Arizona and Mexico between 1898 and 1902. The majority of the photographs were donated by George Pepper to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in 1923. Native communities that Hrdlicka photographed during his research include--Purepecha (Tarasco), Yoeme (Yaqui), Hualapai (Walapai), Havasupai (Coconino), Piipaash (Maricopa), Mojave (Mahave), Tohono O'odham (Papapgo), Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan), Tepecano, Akimel O'odham (Pima), Opata, Cora, Seri, Wixarika (Huichol), Nahua, Otomi and Yoreme (Mayo). Ales Hrdlicka (1869-1943) was born in the Czech Republic moved to the United States in 1881. Hrdlicka became known as the "Father" of Physical Anthropology and worked at the U.S. National Museum (now the National Museum of Natural History).

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Creators:
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997
Dates:
1875-1991, bulk 1931-1991
bulk 1927-1991
Size:
65 Linear feet
Collection ID:
NAA.1988-33
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

Thomas Dale Stewart was a physical and forensic anthropologist and worked at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History from 1931 until his death in 1997. He worked under Ales Hrdlicka until 1943, became the head curator in 1960, director of the museum in 1962, and retired in 1971. Stewart's research interests included physical and forensic anthropology and archaeology, mostly in North and South America. He also worked with the F.B.I. frequently to aid in homicide investigations, and worked extensively with the U.S. Army to identify skeletal remains from the Korean War in Operation Glory. The Thomas Dale Stewart Papers primarily deal with his life and career at the Smithsonian, particularly his research projects and publications between 1931 and 1991. Materials consist mainly of correspondence, photographic material, dossiers based on writings and research projects, and administrative files.

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Creators:
Whitehead, Henry P. (Prenton), 1917-2002
Dates:
1843-2010
bulk 1940-1986
Size:
156.91 Linear feet (178 boxes)
Collection ID:
ACMA.06-042
Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives

The papers of historian Henry P. Whitehead measure 156.91 linear feet and date from 1843 to 2010 (bulk 1945-1986). The collection documents Whitehead's careers, as well as his family and personal life. The collection also includes the personal papers of Tomlinson D. Todd, Elizabeth B. Delaney and the Howard Theatre Foundation. The combined collection is comprised of black theatrical memorabilia; materials relating to civil rights activities in the District of Columbia; and the African American experience in general. Included are playbills, sheet music, admission tickets, newspapers, magazines, books, photographs, clippings, flyers, brochures, pamphlets, sound recordings, research files, and other material.

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Creators:
Medicine, Beatrice
Dates:
1914, 1932-1949, 1952-2003 (bulk dates, 1945-2003).
Size:
28 Linear feet (65 document boxes, 1 box of oversize materials, 1 box of ephemera, 1 shoebox of index cards, 1 map drawer)
Collection ID:
NAA.1997-05
Repository:
National Anthropological Archives

The Beatrice Medicine papers, 1913-2003 (bulk 1945-2003), document the professional life of Dr. Beatrice "Bea" Medicine (1923-2005), a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, anthropologist, scholar, educator, and Native rights activist. The collection also contains material collected by or given to Medicine to further her research and activism interests. Medicine, whose Lakota name was Hinsha Waste Agli Win, or "Returns Victorious with a Red Horse Woman," focused her research on a variety of topics affecting the Native American community: 1) mental health, 2) women's issues, 3) bilingual education, 4) alcohol and drug use, 5) ethno-methodologies and research needs of Native Americans, and 6) Children and identity issues. The collection represents Medicine's work as an educator for universities and colleges in the United States and in Canada, for which she taught Native American Studies courses. Additionally, because of the large amount of research material and Medicine's correspondence with elected U.S. officials and Native American leaders, and records from Medicine's involvement in Native American organizations, the collection serves to represent issues affecting Native Americans during the second half of the 20th century, and reflects what Native American leaders and organizations did to navigate and mitigate those issues. Collection materials include correspondence; committee, conference, and teaching material; ephemera; manuscripts and poetry; maps; notes; periodicals; photographs; training material; and transcripts.

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Creators:
Maltsby, Portia
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture
Dates:
1850-2004, undated
Size:
100 Cubic feet (309 boxes)
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.0408
Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

The collection primarily documents the activities of the National Museum of American History's Program in African American Culture (PAAC) dating from 1979 through 2004. The Program in African American Culture (PAAC) created public programs documenting the black experience in the United States, as well as, other countries. Archival materials include photographs, programs, administrative files, magnetic tape, audiocassettes, U-matic and VHS video cassettes.

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7 records — Page 1 of 1