35 records — Page 3 of 4
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Creators:
Drewal, Henry John
Drewal, Margaret Thompson
Dates:
1970-1989
Size:
10,000 Slides (color)
10,617 copy slides
Collection ID:
EEPA.1992-028
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993). Photographs taken by Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal during the 1970s and 1980s of Yoruba and Ewe art and culture.

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Creators:
Shamir, Marli
Dates:
1966-1976
Size:
33 negatives (photographic) (color, 35mm)
1790 negatives (photographic) (black and white, 120mm)
1,519 color slides (35mm)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2013-009
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

Collection dates from 1966 to 1976 and includes 1,817 black and white negatives, 1,519 35mm color slides, several hundred prints, and manuscript materials. Locations include Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, Israel, Mali, and Niger and depict agriculture, architecture, especially mosques, landscapes, marketplaces, masquerade and musical performances, sculptures, and textiles. Peoples depicted include the Bambara, Bella, Bozo, Dogon, Fulani, Gao, Mandingo, San, Songhai, and Tuarag peoples.

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Creators:
Larrabee, Constance Stuart
Dates:
1900-1997
Size:
circa 11000 negatives (photographic) (black and white and color, 2.5 x 2.5 inches or smaller)
circa 5000 Photographic prints (silver gelatin, black and white, 8 x 10 inches or smaller)
circa 20 Linear feet (Manuscript Materials)
5.4 Linear feet (Office Files)
Collection ID:
EEPA.1998-006
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

The collection dates from 1900 to 1997 and mostly includes images taken in South Africa. The images document the peoples of South Africa, particularly the Loved, Ndebele, San, Sotho, Xhosa, and Zulu peoples. Locations photographed include Basutoland (now Lesotho), Bechuanaland (now Botswana), Johannesburg, Natal, Pretoria, Soweto, Swaziland, Transkei, Transvaal, the Umzimkulu Valley and Zululand. Manuscript and office files include clippings, correspondence, exhibition announcements, invitations and reviews, notes, essays, receipts, and other materials that document Larrabee's career, family history, and personal life.

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Creators:
Ottenberg, Simon
Dates:
between 1951-1960
Size:
1068 slides (photographs) (color)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2000-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

Photographs taken by Simon Ottenberg in Southeastern Nigeria within the Afikpo Village Group, at the time a group of 22 Eastern Igbo villages (sometimes considered part of the Cross River Igbo grouping) in southeastern Nigeria, while on a pre-doctoral Social Science Research Grant from December of 1951 through March of 1953 and during field research from September of 1959 to December of 1960. Also included are photographs taken from June of 1960 to December of 1960 of Abakaliki, a town and the administrative center of the northestern Igbo people, north of Afikpo. According to Dr. Ottenberg in his publication about masked Afikpo rituals, "The Afikpo belong to an Igbo subgroup called Ada or Edda (Forde and Jones 1950, pp. 51-56), which includes the Okpaha, Edda, Amaseri, and Unwana village-groups, all of which border on the Afikpo, and the Nkporo and Adaeze, both short distances away" (Masked Rituals of Afikpo, 1975, p. 3).

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Creators:
Borgatti, Jean
Dates:
1971-2003
Size:
3617 slides (photographs) (color, 35 mm)
166 contact sheets ((2 binders))
3555 negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35 mm)
4 Notebooks ((1 box))
1 cassette tape ((2 boxes))
25 Film reels (Super 8)
Collection ID:
EEPA.2016-007
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

Jean Borgatti's collection dates from 1971 to 2003 and was created in Nigeria and Ghana. Much of the collection documents masquerades, shrines, festivals, market scenes, and ceremonies, and includes images of Urhobo, Uzairue, Ishan (Esan), Etsako, and Otuo peoples.

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Creators:
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)
Dates:
1974-2002
Size:
54 folders
Collection ID:
EEPA.1997-021
Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art

This collection includes education, administrative and program documents collected and produced by the staff of the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, in the conduct of museum business, 1974-2002.

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Creators:
Anacostia Community Museum
Dates:
2010
Size:
2.7 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Collection ID:
ACMA.03-056
Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives

An exhibition documenting the historical journey made by people from Africa to the Americas, along with their language and music. In the 1930s, Lorenzo Dow Turner discovered that the Gullah people of Georgia and South Carolina retained parts of the culture and language of their West African enslaved ancestors. Turner's research produced a living treasury of previously unknown traditions, songs, and folkways that also uncovered and illuminated the connections with West African and Afro-Brazilian communities.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
June 27-July 8, 1990
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.1990
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Dates:
June 30-July 11, 2011
Size:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Collection ID:
CFCH.SFF.2011
Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.

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Creators:
Maltsby, Portia
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture
Dates:
1850-2004, undated
Size:
100 Cubic feet (309 boxes)
Collection ID:
NMAH.AC.0408
Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

The collection primarily documents the activities of the National Museum of American History's Program in African American Culture (PAAC) dating from 1979 through 2004. The Program in African American Culture (PAAC) created public programs documenting the black experience in the United States, as well as, other countries. Archival materials include photographs, programs, administrative files, magnetic tape, audiocassettes, U-matic and VHS video cassettes.

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35 records — Page 3 of 4